Why choose the Articulating Mirror?

big-air-articulating-wakeboard-tower-mirrorWindshield mount mirrors are so yesterday, am I right?
OK, no. We actually love windshield mount mirrors. However, when you have a wakeboard tower you have the ability to bring that mirror higher up and give you better views of your riders.

With so many styles to choose from, why should you choose the Big Air Articulating Mirror?

Let’s start with the most important part – the articulating arm! single-versus-articulating-wakeboard-tower-mirror-arms
This is key to getting you the perfect spot. Most aftermarket wakeboard tower mirrors use a single piece arm. This means that you mount it to the tower and there is no adjustability to it. Where you mount it is what you see.
When using an articulating arm, you have so many options for adjustment. Since we use a 2 piece arm, there are actually more points that you use for adjustment. We explain that in the video below.

The next feature of our articulating mirror that we like to showcase – the size! Reflection_Of_Light_On_Convex_Mirror
We use a tournament style, 7″ x 13″ convex mirror. That is a HUGE mirror! All that area to look at and additional field of vision, yes please!
Convex mirrors enable to you see larger areas, showcased in the image to the left.
You know the little notation on your cars rear view mirrors, objects in mirror are closer than they appear? That is because they are convex too. This allows you more visibility of your rider when they are cutting in and out of the wake. Not only do you have the ability to adjust the arm, but you find that absolute sweet spot by using the ball joint on the back of the mirror head.

Finally, easy installation!
With a large 2.5 inch clamp we can accommodate not only all Big Air towers, but other manufacturers as well. We provide liners to accommodate down to 2.25 inch and 2 inch tubing as well. Install your mirror higher or lower on the tower, the choice is yours. You can even mount on the top of the tower onto the Top Bar or H-Member. Installation is so simple, and we know you’ll love that!

Not sure how to choose the liner you might need? Check out our helpful video – Liner Selection

What are you waiting for? Get yours ordered and on its way to you today!

Pulling An Inflatable With A Tower

Don’t blow us off immediately. Let us explain.
We know it happens. You see people out on the lake pulling inflatables with their tower all the time. Yes, most towers CAN do it, but let us inform you why you shouldn’t.

The biggest problem with towing tubes, or other inflatables, with a wakeboard tower is the multi directional forces that are applied to a towers tow point that just aren’t as rough when used with a wakeboarder. Its not a question of “will it rip the tower off of a boat?” If the tower is installed correctly and the proper backing is applied (if needed) you won’t have a problem with that.

THE NO.1 REASON why tower manufacturers stipulate not to tow an inflatable with the tower is not so much the integrity of the tower, but the hull of your boat. Most wakeboard towers are thoroughly engineered for the forces that come from a wakeboarder, not for an inflatable.

Sure, you might not notice much the first time, or even several after, but you will.
Often when you see gel coats cracking it is not from a bad install (some are, don’t get us wrong) but from misuse of the tower.

Wakeboards, skis, kneeboards, etc. almost always create less line load than a tube, especially a muti-rider tube. Wakeboarders like to play in the wake, so they typically don’t create large side loads.

4 Person Tube Rope

Let’s take this 4-person Tube rope from Overtons. The breaking point on this rope is 4,100 pounds.

ProLine Wake Rope

Most wakeboard ropes don’t generally give a rating for a breaking point, but do state the rope is intended only for towing a single person on water skis, wake/kneeboards, or barefooting. Any other use may cause rope failure.

This Proline Wakeboard Rope from Overtons shows that is provides 2,000 pounds tensile strength. That is less than half of an inflatable rope.

So, lets take a moment to think about that.
Your out having fun, whipping the tube from side to side. Hit a good wake and the tube takes a nose-dive! BOOM! Rope busted! You just transferred 4,100 pounds (or more) to the tower, which in turn was transferred to the hull of your boat. NOT GOOD! That is a lot of stress that was created just in that one moment.

Let’s do a little math…if a submerged tube can create enough load to break a rope at let’s say a conservative number of 2,000 lbs and say the tower is 5 ft tall above the hull.  A simple torque calculation shows that 2,000 lbs x 5ft would create a torque moment of 10,000 ft-lbs on your boat hull.  Yes..that’s right 10,000 ft-lbs!!!  Even if we disperse that load over each tower mount by 4 , we still see a load of 2,500 ft-lbs.    Now do that same math for a wakeboarder.  A max load would likely be 200 lbs… thus creating a max torque load of 1,000 ft-lbs.  Then divide that by 4 and you get a reasonable torque load of 250 ft-lbs…much better!!

You will find that YOU as the driver have a lot more control on how the tube reacts anyway when sticking with the intended rope connection point on the back of the boat. This spot is MADE for tubes or other inflatables.